Dell Alienware AW2521HF Information Appears Online, 24.5″ Model with 240Hz IPS Panel

2 January 2020 – now updated with more information.

A bit of early information about an interesting new gaming monitor from Dell has appeared online. Listed on AMD’s FreeSync monitor list is a new 24.5″ sized model, the Alienware AW2521HF. This features a 1920 x 1080 resolution IPS technology panel, with support for 240Hz refresh rate.

Dell have already recently released a 27″ IPS display with a 240Hz refresh rate, the AW2720HF. That screen is one of the first 240Hz IPS monitors on the market, and we’ve already reviewed Acer’s competing Nitro XV273 X model which gives us an understanding of how well these new panels can perform and just how fast they are.

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Acer VG252QX with 24.5″ IPS Panel and 240Hz Refresh Rate

Acer have released details of another new gaming screen in their lineup. This one looks very similar to the already announced XV253QX but with a more basic stand. The new model is the VG252QX and will feature a 24.5″ sized IPS technology panel with a native 240Hz refresh rate. This is supported by adaptive-sync for VRR from both AMD and NVIDIA systems.

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Acer Predator XB273 X with 27″ 240Hz IPS Panel, 0.1ms G2G and Native G-sync

Acer look set to release a new 27″ model in their Predator gaming lineup. The XB273 X is an interesting option, offering a 27″ screen with 1920 x 1080 resolution and a 240Hz IPS technology panel. There’s been a few 240Hz IPS models announced so far, but what makes this one different is that it will use a traditional hardware G-sync module (a “native G-sync” screen). This is still an attractive option to many gamers who are looking for optimal VRR experience from NVIDIA systems and some of the other common benefits that this hardware offers.

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